spring-flowers

Spring Newsletter

Hi there,

I cannot believe that I have been at this address a year already. Time has flown and I am loving this house and its clinic space and the garden. The jonquils and blossoms have been teasing me to believe that the warmer weather would come earlier. I think spring is our most beautiful season and look forward to it thawing the coldness of winter. The electric blanket on the massage table has been very appreciated, and many patients have wanted to stay even longer in the warm peaceful space and headset that follows a treatment.
I hope that most of you are over the colds and flu that so many have had.  If you are not, here is some tips to combat it and an easy recipe that really works.

Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners help the body boost its own ability to heal so part of the focus is on how you can help yourself get better too. Diet therapy is part of this.

MUNG BEAN DIP
If you have bloating and a gassy stomach, then you may have a weak spleen. As the liver is more likely to be overactive in spring, it can upset the spleen, making bloating much worse. One way mung bean dipto help this is to strengthen the spleen with certain foods such as broad beans. These beans help clear damp and can help people lose weight or reduce a constant runny nose.

1 kg shelled broad beans
1 clove garlic
pinch of salt and black pepper
1 teaspoon ground cumin
100 ml olive oil
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1 teaspoon fresh marjoram

TOPPING – mix
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
1 dessertspoon olive oil
3 finely chopped chives

Drop the broad beans into boiling water to cover and cook for about 10 minutes till soft. Drain off half the water and retain. blend the beans and remaining water, adding marjoram, cumin, garlic, salt, pepper and oils. Add the reserved water to thin, if needed. Place in a bowl, topping with the garnish and serve with crackers or toasted sourdough or rye bread. Yum!!

Why not make an appointment and see how we may help you?
Call or SMS 0418 327 892 during working hours.

The extra cold weather may increase our appetites and we crave additional  calories  to help us stay warm. As the weather warms up, our appetites should drop a little and there is a stirring to get  out and about, stretch and exercise as the Qi moves upwards. In TCM convergence theory, Spring is the season of the liver and gallbladder. These organ systems need expression and movement otherwise tension, tight tendons and anger are likely to increase.

If there is too much internal wind (expressed in itchiness and pain that moves, dizziness, tremors, ringing in the ears, spasms, abdominal gas and pulsating headaches at the back, sides or top of the head, or dryness in the upper body) then external wind can really aggravate these conditions.

Wind, which predominates in spring, can easily increase headaches, depression, irritability and cause agitation and increased road rage. Watch how animals and children are more agitated on a windy day. It is wise to stay indoors if you are not feeling well or are elderly on a very windy day.

Hay fever is a good example of an external wind attack, carrying irritants that stir the liver Qi, upsetting the eyes, weakening the lungs and increasing irritability.

Stay well and happy.

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